Louis P. Lochner (1887-1975) Family Collection, 1524-1975


There are 4 sections to this finding aid:

  1. Biographical Sketch
  2. Scope and Content Note
  3. Donor Information
  4. Folder List

GRAPHIC: see caption below

Friedrich Lochner and three of his four sons from his third marriage, presumably (l. to r.) Gustav, Martin and Ludwig (Louis)

Biographical Sketches

Introduction

The Louis Lochner Family Collection contains material of several Lochner family members, primarily of Louis, of Louis's brother Martin, and of their father Johann Friedrich Karl. The majority of the collection was generated and/or collected by Louis Lochner.

Johann Friedrich Karl Lochner (1822-1902)

J. F. K. (Friedrich) Lochner was born on 23 September 1822 in Nürnberg, Germany. He received his elementary education locally and was trained in the trade of engraving at the Artist Academy in Munich, Bavaria, Germany. Before he finished this schooling he transferred to the teachers seminary in Schwabach, Bavaria, and later continued his studies of liturgics under Professor Friedrich Hommel in Neuendettelsau, Bavaria.

Pastor Wilhelm Loehe sent Lochner to America in 1845, where he was ordained on his arrival and started serving a parish with the United Lutheran and Reformed Salem Church in Toledo, Ohio. When they refused to constitute themselves as a Lutheran congregation, he left to serve parishes in Pleasant Ridge and Collinsville, Illinois, between 1846 and 1850. His next call brought him to Trinity, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, where he served until 1876. At this time he was called to become an instructor at the seminary in Springfield, Illinois. He also served a congregation there until 1887. Due to ill health he returned to Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and remained there as an assistance pastor until his death on 14 February 1902.

Friedrich Lochner survived three wives. He first married C. F. W. Walther’s sister-in-law, Lydia Buenger, in June 1845. She died soon after giving birth to their first daughter in March 1848. The infant daughter died in the same year.

In February 1849 he married Maria Boehme in Pleasant Ridge, Illinois. They had nine children: Christian Friedrich Stephanus (b: 15 Dec 1849); Maria Agnes and Friedrich Christian (b: 30 April 1851); Johannes Timotheus (b: 7 June 1852); Josephine (b: 21 August 1855); Anna Agathe Elisabeth (b: 1 April 1857); Renate Christiana Amalie (b: 13 May 1860) and Daniel Clemens (b: 20 November 1862). Maria Boehme Lochner died on 10 December 1876.

In his third marriage he was united with Maria von Haugwitz. They were married from 4 May 1881 until her death on 31 January 1895. They had six children: Martin Gustav Carl (b: 7 Feb 1883); Gustav Friedrich Ferdinand (b: 3 Feb 1884); Lydia Sophie Louise (b: 9 April 1885); Ludwig Paul Heinrich (b: 22 February 1887); Wilhelm Otto Rudolph (b: 27 March 1890) and a stillborn daughter.

Friedrich Lochner was the editor of the Missionstaube for five years. In addition, he wrote and published a variety of writings: Passions- und Osterbuch, Liturgische Formulare, Der Hauptgottesdienst der Evangelischen Lutherischen Kirche, Die Lage des Alten Ordens der Vereinigten Arbeiter im Staate Illinois, Raphael–ein Gedenkbuch für Konfirmaden, Notwehrblatt... Gegen Angriffe hierarchischen Geistes, Kleines Psalterium, etc.

Louis Paul Lochner (1887-1975)

Louis was born on 22 February 1887 in Springfield, Illinois, to Johann Friedrich Karl Lochner and his third wife, Maria Lochner nee von Haugwitz. His parents gave him the name Ludwig but he signed his name as Louis. He graduated in 1905 from the Wisconsin Music Conservatory. Lochner was awarded honorary doctor of letters degrees by Muhlenberg College in 1942 and by the University of Wisconsin in 1961.

On 7 September 1910 he married Emmy Hoyer; they had two children, Elsbeth and Robert. After Emmy’s death in 1920 Louis Lochner married again on 22 April 1922. He and his second wife, Hilde DeTerra nee Steinberger, had one daughter, Rosemarie.

From 1909 to 1919 Lochner was a foreign correspondent in Germany. In 1919 he became the director of the Berlin Bureau of the U.S. Associated Press and remained in this position until 1946. During this tenure Lochner was the first foreign correspondent who followed the German Army into battle; he accompanied them to Poland in September 1939. He also saw Germany’s western front in Holland, Belgium and France and witnessed the French capitulation in Compiegne in 1940. In 1941 he became a news analyst and commentator for the National Broadcasting Company (NBC) and served in this capacity until 1944. At the end of World War II he served in several governmental missions abroad and was on the Board of Directors for the American Council in Germany.

Louis P. Lochner was awarded numerous fellowships and awards, of which the most prestigious was the 1939 Pulitzer Prince for distinguished services as a foreign correspondent. He authored seven books, including Herbert Hoover and Germany (1960), edited, among other materials, The Goebbels Diaries, and translated several books into English. He was a member of the editorial board of The Lutheran Witness in 1951 and a columnist for The Lutheran Layman and The Lutheran Witness Reporter. Lochner died in January 1975 in Wiesbaden, Germany.

Martin Lochner (1883-1945)

Martin was born 7 February 1883 at Springfield, Illinois, the son of Friedrich and his third wife Marie von Haugwitz.

Martin was confirmed at Trinity Lutheran Church, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and attended Concordia College, Milwaukee (1896-1902). He graduated from Concordia Seminary, St. Louis, in 1905 and accepted a call to Immanuel Lutheran College, Greensboro, North Carolina, an institution of the African American mission program of the Lutheran Synodical Conference. In 1912 he moved to Concordia Teachers College, Addison, Illinois, later at River Forest, Illinois, where he taught languages, music, hymnology and liturgics until his death. He died on 6 February 1945 of a heart attack on a Chicago street near First St. Paul Lutheran Church while on his way to serve as organist at a pastoral conference Communion service.

During his professorships he also served as pastor at Meherrin, Virginia, and Christ Lutheran Church, Oak Park, Illinois. He received a master in music degree from Northwestern University, was a member of the American Guild of Organists and an honorary member of the Pi Kappa Lambda musical society. For many years he edited the music department of the Lutheran School Journal. He served on the music review committee of Concordia Publishing House, on the Choral Union Committee of the Walther League, as a church organ consultant, as head of the music department of Concordia Teachers College and as faculty secretary.

On 9 June 1909 Lochner married Elizabeth Jacobs, and the couple had four sons: Martin Jr., Henry, Fred and William.

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Scope and Content Note

The collection is arranged into four series: Family Subject Files, J. F. K. Lochner, Photos and the Correspondence.

The Family Subject Files series is arranged alphabetically by topics. They include announcement books (Vermeldungsbuch - f.2 and f.3), listing various announcements Pastor. Lochner made during the worship service on a given Sunday, i.e. upcoming weddings, children born into the congregation, etc. The biographical information includes material of all Lochner family members including wives and children. The collection includes a rare document (f.6) that seems to be an official decree dated 1524, allowing the Lochner family to bear their own coat of arms.

The Nürnbergisches Gelehrten Lexicon (f.15), which was published in 1776, contains extensive genealogical information of clergy named Lochner.

The J.F.K. Lochner series contains all the identifiable documents attributed or generated by Johann Friedrich Karl Lochner and his 3rd wife Maria von Haugwitz. He was a renowned artist in various fields, with his paintings generating his greatest artistic fame.

This series contains material pertaining to the Lochner Family Chronicle (f.36-41), which was written and translated by William [Wilhelm] Lochner in 1931. Volume I contains original watercolor paintings from an unknown artist. Toward the middle of the handwritten chronicle (f.37) there are several original letters, postcards and photos that could not be removed.

The Photos series contains a large number of professional photographs taken by Louis Lochner as a member of the U.S. Associated Press in Germany. The photos in the collection represent an extensive visual chronicle of the last German royal family. Present is a detailed assortment of pictures taken at the funeral of Emporer Wilhelm II (f.59, f.64); of the emporer's son, Crown Prince Wilhelm (f.65); and the largest number capture the emporer's grandson, Prince Louis Ferdinand, and his family (f.61-62, f.66-67).

The Correspondence Series is organized in two ways. The correspondence of various family members is arranged in chronological order (f.69-70). The time span of these letters ranges from 1841 to 1944.

Noteworthy in this series is a letter written 20 February 1935 to Karl Lochner in Germany inquiring about the Lochner family history. On the reverse of this letter is a list of “Sheet Music for Pipe Organ” that appears to relate to Martin Lochner's teaching duties at Concordia Teachers College.

The majority of Louis Lochner's correspondence was originally arranged in alphabetical order by topics, and it retains this order. Letters within each folder are in chronological order.

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Donor Information

The majority of the material in this collection was donated by Louis P. Lochner or by his direct descendants. The Martin Lochner letter (20 February 1935) was given to the Institute by Prof. Daniel R. Gahl of Valparaiso University, Valparaiso, Indiana, in February 1981.

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Folder List

Family Subject Files

J.F.K Lochner Series

Photo Series

Correspondence Series

Chronological

Alphabetical

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